SR-22 insurance, also known as a certificate of financial responsibility, is not insurance coverage in itself but rather a document that verifies you have the necessary insurance coverage. It is typically required by the Department of Motor Vehicles (DMV) or relevant authorities for individuals involved in certain driving violations or convicted of specific offenses, such as driving under the influence (DUI), reckless driving, or driving without insurance.

When is SR-22 insurance required?

SR-22 insurance is required when individuals have committed serious traffic violations or offenses that have resulted in the suspension or revocation of their driver’s license. It acts as proof that they now have the appropriate insurance coverage, providing financial responsibility to the state in case of future incidents. The length of time for which SR-22 insurance is required varies depending on the violation and state regulations.

How much does SR-22 insurance cost?

The cost of filing an SR-22 is around $25, but it can vary depending on the state and insurance provider. In some states, you may be required to pay the filing fee upfront. You’ll need to pay the filing fee with every policy term as long as the SR-22 is required.

Who needs SR-22 insurance?

SR-22 insurance is typically required for drivers who are considered high-risk due to certain traffic violations or legal issues. Here are some reasons why someone would need SR-22 insurance.

  • Convicted of a DUI/DWI (Driving Under the Influence/Driving While Intoxicated) or other serious traffic offenses.
  • Involved in an accident while driving without insurance or a valid driver’s license.
  • Accumulated multiple traffic violations or points on their driving record within a short time frame.
  • Someone with a suspended or revoked driver’s license.
  • Failed to pay court-ordered child support, resulting in a suspended license (in some states).

The SR-22 requirement is usually imposed by the state’s Department of Motor Vehicles (DMV) or a court order. The duration of the SR-22 requirement can vary, but it typically ranges from one to three years. During this period, the driver must maintain continuous auto insurance coverage and fulfill all other requirements to regain their driving privileges.

How SR-22 insurance affects insurance premiums

SR-22 insurance can significantly impact insurance premiums. Since drivers who require an SR-22 are considered high-risk, insurance companies typically charge higher rates to cover the increased risk associated with insuring them.

Drivers with an SR-22 requirement will likely experience an increase in their insurance premiums. The extent of the increase depends on various factors, including the driver’s history, the reason for the SR-22, and the insurance provider’s policies.

Insurance companies determine premiums based on the perceived risk of insuring a driver. Having an SR-22 requirement signals to the insurer that the driver has a history of traffic violations or other issues, which increases the likelihood of future claims. As a result, the insurer charges higher premiums to offset this risk.

Drivers with an SR-22 requirement should consider shopping around and comparing quotes from multiple insurance providers. Some insurers specialize in high-risk coverage and may offer more competitive rates for drivers needing an SR-22.

SR-22 requirement by state

SR-22 requirements can vary from state to state, as each state has its own set of laws and regulations regarding driving violations and insurance requirements. Here’s a list of states that require an SR-22 certificate.

  • Delaware
  • Kentucky
  • Minnesota
  • New Mexico
  • New York
  • North Carolina
  • Oklahoma
  • Pennsylvania

Other states require an SR-22 and additional certificates to prove financial responsibility.

  • Florida requires SR-22 and FR-44 insurance
  • Maryland requires SR-22 and FR-19
  • Virginia requires SR-22 and FR-44 insurance

It’s important to check with your state’s Department of Motor Vehicles (DMV) to understand the specific SR-22 requirements and regulations applicable to your situation.

How do you get an SR-22?

To get an SR-22, follow these steps:

  • Contact your insurance provider: Reach out to your current auto insurance company and inform them that you need an SR-22.
  • Provide necessary information: Your insurer will ask for specific details, such as your driver’s license number, policy number and the reason for the SR-22 requirement. Provide all the necessary information to help them process your request.
  • Pay the filing fee: There is typically a filing fee associated with obtaining an SR-22, which is $25 approximately. You’ll need to pay this fee for them to file the SR-22 on your behalf.
  • Submit the SR-22 form: Your insurance company will complete and submit the SR-22 form to your state’s Department of Motor Vehicles (DMV).
  • Maintain continuous coverage: Make sure you maintain continuous insurance coverage during the entire SR-22 period. Failure to do so may result in further penalties, such as suspension of your driver’s license or an extended SR-22 requirement.

The SR-22 requirement duration varies but it usually lasts for three years.

How do I get my SR-22 removed?

An SR-22 won’t be automatically removed from your insurance policy once it’s no longer required. You must contact your insurer to request the removal of the SR-22 from your policy. After removal, there’s a possibility that your insurance rate may decrease if it had increased due to the SR-22 filing, but this is not a guarantee. If your policy gets canceled or lapses while carrying an SR-22, your insurer will notify the DMV, resulting in the suspension of your license.

In a nutshell

An SR-22 certificate is not an insurance policy but rather a document that verifies a driver’s insurance coverage. It is typically required for drivers who have committed serious traffic violations or offenses and acts as proof of financial responsibility to the state. The cost of filing an SR-22 varies by state and insurance provider, and drivers with an SR-22 requirement can expect an increase in their insurance premiums due to their high-risk status. It’s important to maintain continuous coverage during the entire SR-22 period and to contact your insurer to request its removal once it’s no longer required. Be sure to check with your state’s DMV to understand the specific SR-22 requirements and regulations applicable to your situation.

Frequently asked questions

Is an FR-44 the same thing as an SR-22?

No, an FR-44 is not the same thing as an SR-22. While both are forms related to insurance filings, they serve different purposes and are required in different situations. An SR-22 is a form used in many states to verify that an individual has the required auto insurance coverage after being involved in certain driving violations or offenses.

On the other hand, an FR-44 is a similar form, but it typically carries higher liability insurance limits and is required in a few specific states, such as Florida and Virginia, for individuals convicted of DUI.

How long do I need to have an SR-22?

The duration for which you need to maintain an SR-22 varies depending on the violation and the state you reside in. Typically, the requirement lasts from one to three years. However, it’s essential to check with your local Department of Motor Vehicles (DMV) or consult your insurance agent to get accurate information specific to your situation. It’s important to fulfill the required duration without any lapses in coverage to maintain compliance with the SR-22 filing.

If I don’t own a car, do I still need to file an SR-22?

Yes, even if you don’t own a car, you may still need to file an SR-22. In such cases, you can obtain a non-owner SR-22 insurance policy. Non-owner SR-22 insurance provides liability coverage when you drive a vehicle that is not owned by you. It is designed for individuals who frequently borrow or rent vehicles and still need to meet the SR-22 insurance requirement.

About the Author: CompuQuotes Editorial
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